FREE BOOKS

Author's List




PREV.   NEXT  
|<   20   21   22   23   24   25   26   27   28   29   30   31   32   33   34   35   36   37   38   39   40   41   42   43   44  
45   46   47   48   49   50   51   52   53   54   55   56   57   58   59   60   61   62   63   64   65   66   67   68   69   >>   >|  
as Voltaire observes, "was driven to the most calamitous situation that ever poor lady was exposed to; she was obliged to sollicit Cromwel to pay her an allowance, as Queen Dowager of England, which, no doubt, she had a right to demand; but to demand it, nay worse, to be obliged to beg it of a man who shed her Husband's blood upon a scaffold, is an affliction, so excessively heightened, that few of the human race ever bore one so severe." After an active service under the marquis of Newcastle, and the King's cause declining beyond hope of recovery, Shirley came again to London, and in order to support himself and family, returned his former occupation of teaching a school, in White Fryars, in which he was pretty successful, and, as Wood says, 'educated many ingenious youths, who, afterwards in various faculties, became eminent.' After the Restoration, some of the plays our author had written in his leisure moments, were represented with success, but there is no account whether that giddy Monarch ever rewarded him for his loyalty, and indeed it is more probable he did not, as he pursued the duke of Lauderdale's maxim too closely, of making friends of his enemies, and suffering his friends to shift for themselves, which infamous maxim drew down dishonour on the administration and government of Charles II. Wood further remarks, that Shirley much assisted his patron, the duke of Newcastle, in the composition of his plays, which the duke afterwards published, and was a drudge to John Ogilby in his translation of Homer's Iliad and Odysseys, by writing annotations on them. At length, after Mr. Shirley had lived to the age of 72, in various conditions, having been much agitated in the world, he, with his second wife, was driven by the dismal conflagration that happened in London, Anno 1666, from his habitation in Fleet-street, to another in St. Giles's in the Fields. Where, being overcome with miseries occasioned by the fire, and bending beneath the weight of years, they both died in one day, and their bodies were buried in one grave, in the churchyard of St. Giles's, on October 29, 1666. The works of this author 1. Changes, or Love in a Maze, a Comedy, acted at a private house in Salisbury Court, 1632. 2. Contention for Honour and Riches, a Masque, 1633. 3. Honoria and Mammon, a Comedy; this Play is grounded on the abovementioned Masque. 4. The Witty Fair One, a Comedy, acted in Drury Lane, 1633. 5. The Trait
PREV.   NEXT  
|<   20   21   22   23   24   25   26   27   28   29   30   31   32   33   34   35   36   37   38   39   40   41   42   43   44  
45   46   47   48   49   50   51   52   53   54   55   56   57   58   59   60   61   62   63   64   65   66   67   68   69   >>   >|  



Top keywords:

Comedy

 

Shirley

 

Newcastle

 

London

 
driven
 

obliged

 

author

 

Masque

 
demand
 
friends

remarks

 

agitated

 
conflagration
 

happened

 
dismal
 
conditions
 

Odysseys

 

published

 
composition
 

patron


translation

 

drudge

 

writing

 
habitation
 

Ogilby

 

length

 

assisted

 

annotations

 

overcome

 

abovementioned


Changes
 

October

 

private

 

grounded

 
Honour
 

Riches

 
Mammon
 
Honoria
 

Contention

 
Salisbury

churchyard

 

miseries

 

occasioned

 

bending

 
street
 

Fields

 

beneath

 
weight
 

bodies

 

buried